Climate Change Adaption

Over the last couple decades, researchers and communities have been documenting changes to plants, animals, land, and water in Canada's Arctic. Both the scientists and northern people are reporting profound changes such as melting ice and permafrost, forest fires, warmer temperatures, and changing weather patterns. Since our founding in 2007, there has been greater awareness and increasing concern raised regarding the issue of climate change and the impacts on northern communities.

AICBR has been working with communities in Yukon to understand the implications of changing environmental conditions on the health of individuals, families and communities. The impacts of climate change are directly linked to community food security and many of our projects work to understand how climate change and changing environmental conditions are affecting community access to traditional and store-bought foods, availability of traditional and store-bought foods, and changes in food quality. We then work with communities to come up with adaptation strategies and action plans to manage the issues they are facing. The ability to access sufficient amounts of nutritious and safe foods affects northerners in different ways. For example, accessing foods harvested from the land can be challenging with changing land conditions, high fuel and equipment costs, and changes to wildlife health and migration patterns. Store-bought foods can be very expensive, poor quality, of poor selection, and are also at risk to climate change with the vulnerability of transportation and supply routes from the South to changing environment.

Working with individual communities, we have been developing local community climate change and food security adaptation strategies. These context-specific strategies will further inform a Territory-wide strategy in the future. You can also contact us for further information if you are interested in learning more about our approach or working with us on this priority.

Climate Change Reports, Publications & Documentaries

(For full list of reports - go to Reports section)

[pdf] Adapting to Climate Change and Keeping Our Traditions - A Collaboration between Selkirk First Nation and AICBR 2015 - 2016

[pdf] Climate Change and Food Security in the North - A Literature Review 2010

[pdf]  Poster: Vuntut Gwitchin Climate Change and Health Research in Northern Yukon

[pdf] Yukon First Nations Health Promotion Spring School 2007 Report

Ä si Keyi, means "Our Grandfather's land." This dramatic sub-arctic land is changing. The film tells a story about how climate change and the history of food insecurity have affected Kluane First Nations people and the land they call home. It portrays strategic adaptation by embracing their past as the foundation towards prioritizing their culture and traditional values, practices and knowledge. Ultimately, it is a story of resilience of a peoples in the wake of a changing world.

link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=83w3iBDK684 This video by Robert Joe was created for Selkirk First Nation's Keeping Our Traditions project (2015-2016), in collaboration with the Arctic Institute of Community-Based Research in Pelly Crossing, Yukon Territory. The project was an initiative of the Selkirk First Nations government to find strategies for keeping traditional Southern Tutchone practices, values and knowledge amidst the challenges of a changing climate and reconnecting youth to the land. 

link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=83w3iBDK684

This video by Robert Joe was created for Selkirk First Nation's Keeping Our Traditions project (2015-2016), in collaboration with the Arctic Institute of Community-Based Research in Pelly Crossing, Yukon Territory. The project was an initiative of the Selkirk First Nations government to find strategies for keeping traditional Southern Tutchone practices, values and knowledge amidst the challenges of a changing climate and reconnecting youth to the land. 

Preview of a 45 minute video documentary currently in production that will incorporate original footage from 10 years ago of a family's life on the land and the sudden changes they are experiencing.
The land that has sustained the Vuntut Gwitchin, People of the Lakes, in the Far North of Yukon, Canada, is undergoing rapid changes from global warming. This video takes you on a journey from nearly 20 years ago to the present with a community whose very survival is at risk.
The "Vuntut Gwitchin Climate Change and Health Research in Northern Yukon" project was a three phase food security and climate change initiative that began in Old Crow Yukon in 2008.
A film highlighting the "Our Changing Homelands" conference in Old Crow, Yukon, which focused teaching youth about climate change and its affect on their health.